Parseltongue: A Guide

written by [No Name]

The youngest of an ancient and powerful bloodline rumored to be descended from Slytherin himself, Alessandra Slytherie records her findings on her journey to revive the dying language of her ancestors. *This is an unfinished work which is being constantly updated with new information. Last update: 4/18/14

Last Updated

05/31/21

Chapters

6

Reads

14,859

The Alphabet

Chapter 4


















Though there is no official written alphabet of Parseltongue
as it is a verbal language only, there are several distinct sounds that may be
considered the “alphabet” of the language. These sounds include the English
letters “S”, “H”, “N”, “J”, “K”, “L”, “R”, “T”, “Y”, “Z” and all vowels except
“O”.

There are 20 vowel sounds, and 27 consonant sounds, making a total of 47 letters in total in the Parseltongue alphabet.




“Vowels” in Parseltongue: (Sounds that end with
an open mouth; soft sounds)



Ssa



Ssu



Ssie (pronounced sigh)



Ssii (pronounced see)



Sse (pronounced say)



 



Sha



Shu



Shie (pronounced shy)



Shii (pronounced she)



She (pronounced shey)



 



Hsa



Hsu



Hsie (pronounced h-sigh)



Hsii (pronounced h-see)



Hse (pronounced h-say)



 



Hha



Hhu



Hhie (pronounced high)



Hhii (pronounced he)



Hhe (pronounced hay)






“Consonants” in Parseltongue: (Sounds that end with an closed mouth; hard sounds)



Sss



Sst



Ssn



Ssj



Ssk



Ssl



Ssr



Ssz



Ssh



 



Hss



Hst



Hsn



Hsj



Hsk



Hsl



Hsr



Hsz



Hsh



 



Sht



Shn



Shl



Shr



Shz



Shh



Shj



Shk



Shs




Often the most difficult of these to pronounce for humans is the “J”
and “Z” sound in conjunction with an "Hs" or "Sh" sound, and therefore much of
Western Parseltongue has moved away from the use of these letters. However,
they are still recognized as letters in the alphabet.



The most practical way to practice speaking the alphabet of
Parseltongue as a human is to remember the structure of a snake’s mouth. Their
lips are not made to form words as ours are, and so when speaking the language
it can be helpful to imagine that there is a straight rod running from the
front of the lips to the back of the throat on both the roof and bottom of your
mouth. Also avoid moving the lips as much as possible, as snakes do not have
this capability, either.




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